Egadi Archipelago

I am conducting desk-based research on the Egadi Archipelago. I am looking at their history, state of ecosystems, on-going projects related to the use of natural resources, existence of community-based organizations and non-governmental organizations active in the area, activities and rules of the Marine Protected Area.

I am also conducting research on the state of national and international law and policy development on tuna fish fishing, marine protected areas and, more in general, the Mediterranean sea. I am giving special attention to the history of tuna fish fishing in the Egadi as it used to be one of the main traditional activities of the archipelago. In particular, the fishing of bluefin tuna (that used to be done in the Tonnara of Favignana through the ancient practice called “mattanza dei tonni”) was halted in 2007 after centuries of activity. In 2019 – after a national law ruled for the Tonnara to receive a share of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas quota system – the Tonnara was activated again. However, because the quota is too small to be economically sustainable, in 2020 the mattanza did not happen again.

Many are the issues that will be explored on the sustainability and opportunity to start the mattanza again.


As part of the SCELG initiative on islands and Covid-19, I have written a report on the Egadi’s responses to covid-19 and their developments towards more sustainable and resilient economies. The report was published within the the SCELG and University of Prince Edward Island (UPEI) COVID-19 Island Insights Series, which is aimed at bringing together critical assessments of how specific islands around the world have performed during the Covid-19 pandemic and the extent to which their recovery plans can promote resilience and sustainability in the long term.